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"The woman who follows the crowd will usually go no further than the crowd. The woman who walks alone is likely to find herself in places no one has ever been before."

Albert Einstein  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via thatkindofwoman)

BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network →

culturejolt:

There is tons of information on this websites, offering education on various traditions of Buddhism. Whether you’re someone know is looking into the Buddhism for the first time or an experienced practitioner, this website is full of free information, including eBooks for kindle, worksheets and study guides. If you are looking into Buddhism and don’t know where to start, I highly recommend this website. It has personally served me well. There is even a page dedicated to finding a temple near you, in any part of the world.

(via crimson-twinkie)

itsawasplife:

Rest in Peace, Robin Williams

itsawasplife:

Rest in Peace, Robin Williams

(via teachingliteracy)

"Emptiness can be such a heavy burden….Until you discover that it’s in the void where you can create something new, something special - that to paint a masterpiece, you first need a blank canvas."

— (via seedeeply)

(via crimson-twinkie)

The Other Gospels →

panatmansam:

“For there exists a great and boundless aeon, whose extent no generation of angels could see, in which is the great invisible Spirit, which no eye of an angel has ever seen, no thought of the heart has ever comprehended, and it was never called by any name.”

The Gnostic Gospel of Judas (ca…


"

I think that’s the biggest lesson wolves can teach anybody: shut up and be quiet; get out of your own tunnel and your world and actually take a moment to look at something else that’s going to look at you…

Wolves contemplate you. They don’t just look at you, they
look right through you.

"

— Kent Weber, director of Mission:Wolf (via wolveswolves)

(via thingsthatsing)


thebooker:

literatureloveaffair:

There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.
If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:
25 thoughts on book piracy
Book piracy - an insiders perspective 
Why I stopped pirating and started paying for media 
The ethics of internet piracy 
The real problem with piracy 
Piracy is yesterday’s worry for today’s ‘artisan authors’
Kindle e-book piracy accelerates
John Green: Why libraries are different from piracy
Across the digital divide
Now on to some free books!
Libraries 
Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!
Classics
Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.
Misc. 
PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss. 
Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 
These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 
Go forth and read responsibly!

This post is amazing!

thebooker:

literatureloveaffair:

There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.

If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:

Now on to some free books!

Libraries 

  • Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
  • If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
  • Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
  • Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
  • Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!

Classics

  • Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
  • Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
  • Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
  • LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.

Misc. 

  • PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
  • If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss
  • Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
  • Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 

These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 

Go forth and read responsibly!

This post is amazing!

(via writeworld)

humansofnewyork:

“It seems that the more I tried to make my life about the pursuit of art, the more money controlled my life: collecting unemployment insurance, the humiliation of borrowing money from friends and family, tossing and turning at night while trying to figure out how to pay the rent. To survive I had to work hard jobs and afterwards I’d feel too tired and too stressed to paint. It’s very hard to create under those circumstances. Creativity is a delicate process. Often times I wonder if I should have just pursued a career for the first half of my life, obtained some degree of financial security, and then transitioned into art.”

humansofnewyork:

“It seems that the more I tried to make my life about the pursuit of art, the more money controlled my life: collecting unemployment insurance, the humiliation of borrowing money from friends and family, tossing and turning at night while trying to figure out how to pay the rent. To survive I had to work hard jobs and afterwards I’d feel too tired and too stressed to paint. It’s very hard to create under those circumstances. Creativity is a delicate process. Often times I wonder if I should have just pursued a career for the first half of my life, obtained some degree of financial security, and then transitioned into art.”